Another vintage year of IB results

Many congratulations to Wellington’s largest ever International Baccalaureate Diploma cohort who have received some of the strongest examination results in the College’s history.

97 pupils from this year’s Upper Sixth chose to pursue the IB Diploma instead of A-Levels, a curriculum which sees them study six academic subjects (graded out of 7) as well as a core component (graded out of 3). In general terms a 7 equates to an A* at AS or A-Level and each pupil therefore achieves an overall score out of 45.

On results day, the average score for this year’s cohort was a remarkable 38.9, a score which will only go up as remarks come in over the weeks ahead. For the fourth year in a row, just under half the cohort secured a score of 40+ and two students have currently secured the full 45 points: Ludo Goldsmith (Hg) and Dominic Atherton (Pn). This came as particularly good news to Mr Richard Atherton, Dominic’s father, who teaches Maths and runs the IB Diploma programme at Wellington!

To put these statistics in context, 149,382 young men and women from 136 different countries graduated from the IB Diploma programme in 2016. The worldwide average was 30 points and only 146 of these students (fewer than 0.1%) achieved the full 45 points.

The Master, Mr Julian Thomas, commented, “A real focus for both students and teachers at Wellington over the past two years has been to develop a genuine intellectual thirst within our graduates as well as a true sense of independent thought and learning – traits which are ingrained in the IB Diploma programme. To see this drive rewarded with such a superb set of results for our Class of 2017 is hugely gratifying. They have been a wonderful year-group, achieving a huge amount of success in the co-curriculum and proving themselves to be fine young men and women in their broader lives. They can now move on to university not only with a fine set of examination results under their belt, but also with the character and skills needed to make the very most of their adult lives at university and beyond. We are hugely proud of them.”

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